From Land Rovers to Ferraris | An Exclusive Interview With Amy Shore

'55 Land Rover 

'55 Land Rover 

'55 Land Rover 

'55 Land Rover 

We recently came across Amy and her work via discovering her shoot of the '55 Land Rover series. It hit a soft spot in our weakness for Defenders, and we wanted to know more. Looking into her work felt almost (almost) as good as being along for the ride. Here is our exclusive interview. For more photos visit Amy online or find her on Instagram. 

Q. First of all, tell us about this gorgeous Defender. How was the ride?

AS. The ride in the Defender was a tad bumpy to say the least! Lack of seat belts, suspension, roof or doors caused for a rather adrenaline-filled ride, but my, was it fun. Who would have thought being hit in the face with twigs as you drive through a forest would be considered fun?! Talking to the owner, Jason, I felt completely confident that this machine would get me through any water, ice, mud or other obstacle that could possibly get in my way. 

'55 Land Rover 

'55 Land Rover 

'55 Land Rover 

'55 Land Rover 

'55 Land Rover 

'55 Land Rover 

'55 Land Rover 

'55 Land Rover 

Q. And what about photography? How and why did you end up doing what you do so brilliantly? We've noticed several of your shoots in your portfolio feature fine looking classic cars. Could you tell us a bit about your love affair with cars? How did you get started capturing man's second best friend?

AS. Photographing cars was something that I accidentally fell into. I'm a trained metalsmith and jeweller! I wanted to look into working with classic car restoration and bodywork (panel rolling/beating) and had the absolute pleasure of visiting a workshop doing just that on one of my travels for Petrolicious. My father used to work for Lotus Formula 1 creating models to be tested in the air tunnel and has worked in classic car restoration for many years himself so a love for classic cars has been something I've always known. However, during my second year at University, I suffered a third degree burn to my left hand whilst polishing a piece of metal which put me off slightly...! After finishing my degree, I got asked to photograph my first ever car - a Ferrari P4 replica, for the makers of this beautiful vehicle (friends and previous employers of my father). The images ended up a long way around the internet thanks to automotive photographer Easton Chang posting them onto his Facebook page and a year later, I'm now a car photographer! It's been one incredible and fast year. I still shoot weddings though which I adore - the last wedding I shot, my assistant and I were actually the very last to leave, we enjoy it so much. 

Porsche 964 Carrera RS Coupe - Amy Shore for Up Knörth

Porsche 964 Carrera RS Coupe - Amy Shore for Up Knörth

Ferrari Daytona 

Ferrari Daytona 

Ferrari P4

Ferrari P4

Ferrari P4

Ferrari P4

Q. Of all your automotive shoots, any personal favourites that have stuck with you? Most memorable ride?

AS. In regards to my favourite shoots, my first with the P4 replica will always be a favourite and I'm forever thankful to that car and its makers. Otherwise, probably a shoot that I shot only last week for Classic Driver with four incredible machines - a Ferrari 250 TdF, a Ferrari 275 GTB, a Porsche 550 Spyder and a Porsche 904. It was definitely a memorable and exhilarating day. My father used to tell my brother and I stories of how he would find the most expensive and rare car in the workshop to eat his lunch in when he was younger. With this in mind, whilst on the shoot I ate my lunch whilst sitting against the Spyder. Other than that, does shooting Pitts Specials performing aerobatics in formation at 2000ft count?!

Pitts Specials upside-down, mid-air at 2,000ft.  

Pitts Specials upside-down, mid-air at 2,000ft.  

UK. That sounds incredible! From the photos it definitely looks like a memorable ride!

Q. One things we're always curious about is the 'behind the scenes' of such stunning, 'in-the-moment' photography. When you're shooting do you meticulously plan out 'scenes' or just go along for the drive and see what happens?

AS. Behind the scenes, I should probably have more of a set up than I do. A lot of the time, I have total free reign on the shoot and have a rough idea of what the client wants and what I want to achieve but with my style of photography, I try to keep plans as loose as possible and meet my brief as best I can to my style. For the Land Rover shots for example, we drove out to the roughest area we could find.  I then noticed how great the green of the LR against the wet, orange mud looked. We were then driving along a tunnel of trees which looked awesome so I got Jason to stop and let me run out forwards to shoot it. However, some shoots need to be better planned - the Aston Martin shots I recently did needed more planning. We were up at 4am to drive along a set route through the centre of London to make sure we had the best shots before London traffic woke!

Behind the scenes. 

Behind the scenes. 

4am Aston Martin wakeup 

4am Aston Martin wakeup 

Q. The 4am wakeup paid off - The Aston looks at home in those photos. Like something straight out of James Bond. So, it sounds like you've dipped your fingers into anything from cars to planes to weddings. Are there any upcoming or dream projects we should watch out for?

AS. Dream projects? Classic Le Mans, definitely. I've never shot outside of the UK yet so would absolutely love to have an opportunity to do so. My ideal kind of shoot would be to be the photographer of a road trip with a small group of classic cars and their owners - photographing not only the beautiful vehicles and they scenery, but the relationships of the owners to their cars, the fun of parking up and eating lunch with one another, laughing with a beer with one another - the whole experience documented. My heart is aching for that experience even as I write!! 

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For a more in-depth look into her works, visit her amazing gallery at Amy Shore Photography, find her on Facebook and follow her stunning Instagram account @amyshorephotography 

All photography courtesy of Amy Shore

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